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Book review: Songs of the Mist

Sometimes you take too long to complete a book and then you don't want to attempt to capture your feelings about it - because you are sure you are not going to do a justice to it. What makes it harder is that you are not quite familiar with the genre. Yes that is what 'Songs of the Mist' did to me - rather has been doing to me - yet am giving an attempt.

Book Name: Songs of the Mist: Volume 1 (The Monk Key Series)
Author: Shashi
Genre: Fiction - Spiritual
Characters: Ashutosh, Ayan, Vasudha, Calliope, Kyaka, the Monk
Disclaimer: I received this book from the author free of cost in return for an honest review.

Five persons from different walks of life and world take a journey of their lifetime to meet a Monk at the Himalayan range. They almost have nothing in common except their thirst to try to seek and learn what they know not about life. No, this has not much to about their pain and suffering (there is), as their paths and destiny towards the Himalaya in search of the elusive Monk.

I was comparing our TBR piles with a friend of mine and he mentioned about the book that he had recently and how much he enjoyed it, adding that it would not be my cup of tea at all yet that I should give it a chance some day "when I grow up" (yup that is what he said). That irked me as well as perked up my curiosity, and ended up listening to him going gaga over 'Songs Of the Mist', and this happened to be, just a day or two after I received the book for review. Needless to say, the subject handled is not at all my forte or even something that I might wonder into during one of my lost trail of thoughts. Yet here I am doing the same thing that 'the' friend did to me - going gaga about it to people who may not even venture out to these kinda books.

Remember, when you read or I made you read "The Monk who sold his Ferrari" before it became the 'cool' book? People who said me this was similar to it, you are wrong, this book is lot more than that. I should warn you, this is not an easy read. This is not the book you can read on a dentist waiting room (I tried doing that) nor a book that you would want to breeze through to increase your reading count. But you have to read it - if you had questions that were too cool to ask your parents or those answers you smirk at when they give you. It is a really hard book to get hooked to at least in the first few pages and then out of nowhere you seemed to be nodding without realizing you are.

I am pushing off writing what I really liked about the book. Shashi's writing style and clarity of thoughts. His language held my attention in a book which has such a serious subject, too many descriptive sentences for my liking and a not so fast moving story. Just when you were about to skip a line or so, (only because novels these days requires not more than a speed reading, am not sorry to say that) he just grabs the attention with something so off your balance that you are nodding your head to glory, once again.

Here those few lines that I had to share because they resonated with my line of thoughts.
Never worry about the path. Just take care of the steps you take. 

Don't grieve for desires that are not fulfilled. Sometimes the things that don't happen keep disasters from happening too.

Passion focuses your mind to one thing that you are doing and leaves no space for something else to enter

This book would be an interesting read if you want to read about not so mundane questions that you can't ask others, like 'why we draw a circle of water around the plate before we eat?(pariseshanam - I think)' or 'why would anyone want to live at such harsh living conditions near Himalayas?. It would be a sure read if you were among the ones that discuss and think about self realization or worry what we do here - go read his book and go have a chat with the author, right then. If you don't fall in either of the categories, and you are anything like me - just go read for his language, nuances and attention to minutest detail, and for once - the crisp edit, even if the genre is not your cuppa tea. 

P.S I hadn't known until I almost finished my review that the brilliant editing was from our very own CBC's Mahesh and Nandhitha. Kudos to you, guys - super proud.

1 comment:

  1. Well what can I say, other than... WOW Gayathri Lakshminarayanan.I am so happy that you took your time out to read something that is not your choice of reading. I glad that the book had you thinking ...

    I am grateful for your review and probably the honestest as yet (Well there goes my reputation for good english)... but WOWed me was the lines below...
    "Remember, when you read or I made you read "The Monk who sold his Ferrari" before it became the 'cool' book? People who said me this was similar to it, you are wrong, this book is lot more than that."
    ___
    Shashi
    ॐ नमः शिवाय
    Om Namah Shivaya

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